How to Create Successful Facebook Ads

A number of successful Boutir sellers agreed that placing advertisements on Facebook can greatly increase sales and help them gain sustaining profits. Adobe’s Social Media Intelligence Report pointed out that Facebook has achieved a double-digit increase in both click through rate (20%) and ad impressions (41%), quarter over quarter.

Sadly, out of the 25 million small businesses active on Facebook, only 4% are running Facebook Ads. How to make attractive Facebook Ads? There are four salient elements that you need to include in your Facebook ads.

1. It’s visual.

Visual content is treated more favorable in the Facebook algorithm. What’s more, visual content attracts more “Likes” and is more engaging in the ever-changing News Feed, and therefore is more likely to catch your customers’ eye. No matter what type of ad you create, your image needs to be visually appealing and attention grabbing.

Every time you are creating a new campaign, take time to test the ads in different designs and find out the most suitable type for your target customers.

2. It’s relevant.

Relevance is critical for success when using Facebook advertising. Remember, you are spending money when someone views or clicks on your ad. You can adjust the settings, such as age groups, genders, geographic locations, interests and so on, to reach your target customers.

Facebook recently launched a new feature on the Facebook advertising platform that rates your ads and gives you a relevance score, similar to Ad Rank in Google AdWords. The more relevant your ad image, ad copy, and destination page is to your audience, the higher your score is, and the more favorably Facebook will treat your ads.

3. It includes an enticing value proposition.

A value proposition tells the readers why they should click on your ad to learn more about your product. How is your product or service different from any others? Why should the viewers click on your ad to see your website?

Your value proposition should be believable. Saying you have the greatest coffee in the world will not make people come to your business’s page, but maybe offering 20% off will.

4. It has a clear call-to-action.

A beautiful and relevant ad is great, but without a call-to-action (CTA), your viewers might not know what to do next. Your CTA should encourage people to click on your ad now. Include “Click here”, “Book Now” or “Buy now and save X%,”, “Offer ends soon” to add a sense of urgency to your viewers.

Four Tips for Beautiful Product Photo

If you are selling online, you may want to take attractive product photos to enhance online sales and the value of your business. With the following tips, you are able to take high-quality and beautiful images with affordable gears and simple settings. Trust me, you can do it!

1. Camera

Although having a DSLR was necessary for taking quality product photographs, smartphones have dramatically changed the game. iPhone can also produce professional shots. I strongly encourage sellers to explore using your smartphone after you have the proper setup. That should be the step

before committing to the purchase of a high-end camera. You may be surprised.

2. Lighting

If you can find a way to use natural light, do it. Set up your shot near a window (or near a white wall if it reflects enough window light). After taking product photographs, you can also use free mobile apps, such as “Adobe Photoshop Express” and “Photo Editor”, to edit your images.

3. Background

Set your background as simple as possible. Normally, a white background tends to work the best. Other colors can work if they are not too distracting and do not clash with what you are photographing. For small items such as jewelry, you may use more interesting backgrounds. Some sellers use vintage books, wood, paper and cloth to help with showcasing their goods.

4. What to Shoot

Take pictures from every angle you can think of, and shoot way more than you think you need to. If you are trying to sell something, include a variety of pictures. A close-up detail, a shot of the whole thing, and a couple of different angles will help people see what they’re getting.

Hong Kong Pride Parade

Events celebrating and protesting LGBT rights have taken place in many parts of the world over the last several months. Hong Kong enjoyed its annual parade on November 10, with a theme “dare to love”, attracting people from all over the world. Starting from Victoria Park, the attendees dressed in a variety of fashions denoting their occupation or favorite social theme, calling for equal opportunities and fair treatment in the work place. With a huge rainbow flag and colorful popping bubbles, the happy throng paraded through the city centre creating a carnival-like atmosphere during the two-hour-long procession.

A huge rainbow flag is carried by participants during the 4th Hong Kong LGBT parade.

The Hidden Side of organic Farming in Hong Kong

It is sometimes a bit stressful to write an investigative story, but it always excites me. On this occasion, I was really lucky to meet some farmers who were willing to talk about the hidden side of the organic market, but it was not easy to build up trust with them and persuade them to talk about some of the more sensitive issues.

I tried to visit as many organic farms and organic markets as possible in the New Territories and carry out a little research before I started to do interviews. Gathering background information paid off during interviews as
my contributors seemed to respect the fact that I knew something about the industry and opened up a little more.

I also visited some self- proclaimed organic strawberry farms on the mainland and found that most of them did not have any certi cation. There are a lot more certi cation centers on the mainland and the situation is more complicated. But not having unlimited time I decided to focus on the organic market in Hong Kong.

The main story reveals certain “secrets” of organic farmers and also highlights frequent infringement of the regulations. I have also tried to explain the reasons behind some of the malpractices which have been the subject of reports by agricultural experts. The second story covers some of the public misconceptions about organic food. Finally I have presented an opinionatives ummary where I share some important facts and figures with you.


Facing the onslaught of a growing number of cheaper agricultural products imported from the mainland, Mr Yu Soeng-Kwong has been

suffering greater and greater losses. He learned from his peers that selling organic vegetables was much more profitable, so he finally decided to start practicing organic farming.

However, making the change did not make Mr Yu’s life easier. Having undergone a radical change in his farming methods he also went through the rigorous procedure to obtain organic certification. Since establishing himself as an organic farmer his biggest headache has been trying to compete with a number of farmers who sell their self-proclaimed organic vegetables at a much lower price.

In research conducted by the Hong Kong Organic Resource Center (HKORC) in March 2014 it was said that nearly 80 percent of stalls in
90 street markets were selling self-proclaimed organic vegetables without any official organic certifications.

Higher profits have lured farmers into taking the risk of selling fake organic vegetables which have been palmed off on a lot of unsuspecting customers. The lack of regulation and control of organic produce and surging prices are two major causes of the chaos in the organic market.

In Hong Kong there are two main organizations which provide organic certification and have the right to issue green labels – the Hong Kong Organic Resource Center (HKORC) and the Hong Kong Organic Certification Center

(HKOCC). Certificates issued by these two centers have to be renewed annually with a payment of HK$ 3000 and HK$ 10,000 respectively.

Farmers who successfully achieve certification agree to adopt the organic standard, growing produce without using chemical fertilizers
and pesticide, genetically modified organisms, preservatives, additives and irradiation, according to the Food and Health Bureau.

However, the reality can be very different
and complex as the organic verification system
is fraught with loopholes and grey zones. Can customers have any confidence in the organic certification system and those green labels? To what extent are organic farmers complying with guidelines or is it all just about fake products and high prices.

 

Is Brunei a “Boring” Country?

Brunei is probably not a usual destination for most travel and it is always labeled as boring or “no fun”. My parents chose this place for holiday and they invited me to come. I was more than happy to join since I haven’t been to a strict Islamic country yet. I was so surprised to find that the gasoline in this country was cheaper than water! Located in Southeast Asia, Brunei is super rich in natural gas and petroleum resources, which allows its people to enjoy great wealth.

The first impress that I had for Brunei was the low pace lifestyle. It took each of us around 5 minutes to cross the customs when we first arrived. Eating in the restaurants, we were normally required to wait for around half an hour to get your food. Though the efficiency drove me mad sometimes, I gradually got used to it and tied to be more patient for Brunei people.

The tour guide told us that Bruneians were very proud of their amazing social welfare such as completely free medical care and education. If a students want to study aboard, the government will pay the tuition fee as long as they will serve the country for ten years after graduation. And also, if people suffer serious illness and need medical treatments outside the country, the government will pay all your expenses including the air tickets for the patient and family who accompany.

There are more we can jealous of – the housing policy. Local people can apply for the public houses and borrow money from the government. Normally, it takes around 7 year for people to pay off the loan, with just few hundred Hong Kong dollars per month. It is easy to find a lot of public houses along the streets while we were visiting the city. You would not believe that all those houses have a huge garden and 10 bedrooms at average. However, alcohol and cigarette are forbidden in Brunei, which has made my dad a bit upset during the trip. So if you are a alcoholist,  it is not a place for you then.

 

 

Travel to North Korea – Pyongyang

Nothing can be more excited than getting an opportunity to visit North Korea, the so call most isolated and mysterious country in the world. So many questions came to my mind immediately – Is it safe there? Can I have enough food to eat? Where can I exchange my money before I go? I was confused, curious and a bit worried.

We, a group of journalism students, took the Pyongyang airline in the Beijing airport. Each of us had a North Korea style hamburger on the plane. Seriously, it tasted really terrible and that is why I decided to head to the grocery store for some cup noodle once we arrived the hotel (but this is a stupid decision).

We were not allowed to take any pictures at the Pyongyang airport, but some of my classmates did. Unfortunate, the tour guide saw that asked them to delete the photos right away. In fact, the customs officer even checked some of our iPhones very carefully when we crossed enter boarder. But anyway, we all got into the city!

Every photograph we wanted to take needed permission from the tour guide because we was not allowed to capture certain aspects of life in North Korea, like the local people, soldiers, workers and construction sites. But since we were a group of people, sometimes we just took it anyway when the guide busy introducing the attractions. Two cameramen followed us for the whole journey, filming almost every moment. They said they would make a CD for us at the end and we could choose to buy it or not (it was damn expensive as I remember).

We could not wander around freely, which was a completely different experience of travelling. We have little opportunity to interact with locals and in turn, the locals were too afraid to interact with the foreign visitors. The tour guide told us if the citizens have talked to tourist, they would get into trouble.

We stayed in a five-starts hostel where electricity was cut off from time to time. No Internet of course and no phone call could be made, but we could still “enjoy” some local and Chinese TV channels in our room. I have never seen their currency during the whole trip. However, RMB was accepted in all souvenir stores. I was very curious how they exchange the money back?

In our five-days trip, we checked out a lot of statues and monuments where we needed to offer flowers and bow to show the respect of their president and revolutionary martyrs. We also went to the DMZ, the most fortified border between North Korea and South Korea. It was fun to visit one of their kindergartens and primary school and watch the performance by local kids.

Everything that they showed in us in Pyongyang City looks great but don’t forget many North Korea people are still suffering starvation and struggling with their life. People here are not able to enjoy the freedom that we have. After I came back, I checked out a lot of videos and books that disclose the real life of people in North Korea. I felt extremely complicated and upset.

A Fishman in Lamma Island- Uncle Ming

Because of the increasing fuel price, implement of environmental policy as well as variable weather in recent years, Fishing is suffering a tough time. Most traditional fishermen decide to divert to other fields. Uncle Ming, being as one of the local traditional fishermen, with great luck, found his new job eight years ago and now works as a fisherfolk docent in Lamma fisherfolk’s village.

“As the leaving and retiring of older generation fishermen, some valuable “fisherfolk” culture like fishfolk wedding, traditional way of making dragon boat, weaving the fishing net and frizzling up salty fish pass into silence gradually,” said Cheng Wah Ming with a sense of pity.

Uncle Ming has contributed his own fishing boat which he used to live in with his ten sisters and brothers, as well as all his personal stuff to set up a small fisherfolk’s museum, hoping that all visitors could have a first – hand experience of fishmen’s life and better understand their culture.

“I know even thought it won’t make a big change under my own steam, I am trying my best to remain our traditional fisherfolk culture by working as a docent here. I love my job and it seems a responsibility for me, it is really meaningful.” said Uncle Ming.

“I did the decoration and wrote every piece of spring couplets here by myself.” He said with a bit of pride. And he is in this way, using each tiny action, carry out his promise to preserve fishfolk culture.

Uncle Ming is glad to share his own way of making fish nets and drying salted fish with visitors. But he looks more attractive when he performs magic! “I already have a lot of fans!” he joked. “I learned by reading books and simple wish to bring greater happiness to my visitors.”

Like most fishermen, Uncle Ming believes fishing will be his first and also the last job. However, not everyone get that piece of good luck. “For most of traditional fishermen, with inadequate education and poor stamina in their age, they have to work as sanitation workers or stevedores in urban city when they no longer work as fishermen.”

The <Fisheries Protection Ordinance> will be put into practice in the coming December. Legislative Council has passed the legislative amendments to ban trawling (including pair, stern, shrimp and hang trawling) in Hong Kong waters. By conservative estimates, around 400 trawl boats owners will be affected.

Even though the government is going to buyout those affected inshore trawlers from trawler owners who voluntarily surrender their vessels, it occasioned Uncle Ming much anxiety. “What those fishermen lose will not be simply a fishing boat, but the spiritual patron for their living.” Said Uncle Ming with a sense of sadness.

Being a Volunteer Teacher in Gansu

[ 在甘肅做義教,學懂知足和珍惜 ] 能有機會去甘肅義教是我覺得在大學期間最大收獲的一件事,我非常感謝這次經歷給我帶來的友誼和成長。其實,在短短的幾個星期裡面,我自己覺得我沒有教會孩子太多的知識,但相反,他們卻教會我一生受用的道理-如何知足和珍惜。

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